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Tim Peter Thinks

Tim Peter

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May 13, 2006

Why meme marketing might not be all it’s cracked up to be…

May 13, 2006 | By | No Comments

I’ve been quiet for a bit. Lots of travel again, but mostly because I haven’t had a lot to say. I’m actually working on a longer piece about how companies should think about a little silence from time to time in order to really appeal to their audience. More on that later. In the meantime, Josh Kopelman put together a piece over at Redeye VC that serves as a great introduction to the problems new companies face in finding an audience, even in today’s hyper-literate, hyper-connected world. Similar to my piece about how many companies are finding smaller niches, with a healthy dose of my comments about Web 2.0 lacking a killer app thrown in for good measure. Excellent thoughts. Josh just might make my regular reading list.

Tim Peter

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April 13, 2006

Game over, dude…

April 13, 2006 | By | No Comments

Another quick thought before heading back to tropical bliss. A review on MercuryNews.com talks about the new Windows on Mac software. A separate story begs the question: does it really matter? Should business worry about the OS anymore, or only on the browser?

Tim Peter

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April 13, 2006

Actor’s death sparks disruptions in Bangalore; IT hit – Computerworld

April 13, 2006 | By | No Comments

Just a quick thought on this: Actor’s death sparks disruptions in Bangalore; IT hit – Computerworld. When dealing with your global customers, don’t assume they’re just like you.

Tim Peter

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April 9, 2006

Savoring, Skimming, and Peace on Earth

April 9, 2006 | By | No Comments

Anne, who loyal readers know I’m a huge fan of, had a recent post about how blogs are for savoring, not skimming. I’m inclined to agree, though for more decidedly philosophical reasons than normal. Call this my Cluetrain Manifesto, in the sense that I’ve just gotten a clue and need to declare it from every rooftop I can find, virtual or otherwise. I’m in the Bahamas with my wife and daughters, taking a much needed holiday. I’m a lucky guy. I have a job that both provides me enjoyment and pays me well. My daughters, aged 10 and 8, are an absolute hoot. My wife is beautiful on the inside and out. My family is healthy, and so am I. My parents, though working through a couple of health issues, remain mentally alert and happy as can be to be walking the planet. So, Anne, my only argument with your thesis is that you didn’t go far enough. Life itself is worth savoring. Whether your thing is engaging in a virtual community of like-minded souls who choose to comment on the vagaries of our existence, or if you prefer hearty, he-man activities in the great outdoors, or any and all stops along that continuum, savor away. We’re put here for a finite period. Live in the now; enjoy the journey. I may be quiet for a few days as I savor these moments. I hope you do the same.

P.S. – Shameless marketing plug: you can buy “The Cluetrain Manifesto” in print from Amazon.com, if you’d like. And yes, I do receive a vig. You could also just go to Amazon, search “Cluetrain” and buy it without spiffing me. Seriously.

Tim Peter

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April 6, 2006

Web Development Sees ‘Marketing Renaissance’ – companies moving efforts online

April 6, 2006 | By | No Comments

Interesting article today on Clickz, about companies’ new online marketing efforts, shown by the recent surge in web development activity. It seems businesses are (once again) waking up to the web, only this time they’re seeing it as part of their integrated marketing efforts, as opposed to the stand-alone efforts from the last century. Companies that recognize and maximize the value of their web presence across traditional web sites, mobile, RSS, email, etc., should see the greatest customer loyalty, and the accompanying sales, because they make it so simple for customers to interact with their brand in the way that works best for the customer. The key is to do it in a way that keeps costs in check, so that it’s not just a way to drive buzz, but a way to drive profits, too.

Tim Peter

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April 5, 2006

The evolution of niche content and brand fragmentation

April 5, 2006 | By | No Comments

One of the great things about Web 2.0 is its ability to allow consumers to control how they consume content and interact with your brand. Fred posted a link that brings together two of my favorite things: baseball and disruptive technologies. Clearly, Ballbug is like memeorandum for baseball; it is also so much more than that. It represents consumers taking control of their access to yet another type of product. Consumers of news, political commentary, and technology started the trend. You can look at what offerings like SideStep, Kayak, and Mobissimo are doing in the travel space. Expect other industries to feel that same push over time. As a consumer, I think that’s cool. As a marketer, it tells me I’ve got to work a little harder to infuse my brand into everything I do, whether it’s content, product, or service. It’s also an opportunity to beat my competition to it. Isn’t it fun when the rules change?

Tim Peter

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April 3, 2006

The Times, they are a changing…

April 3, 2006 | By | No Comments

I’ve got to stop using that joke. Seriously.

Anyway, I saw a demo of My Times, the New York Times RSS reader a few weeks back. Interesting notion. They’re looking to use their journalists and editors to filter various blogs and websites. I think it’s a clever way for them to leverage the power of their brand and extending it into a new area. Should be interesting to see if they can pull it off.

Tim Peter

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April 2, 2006

Are we getting ready to party like it’s 1999 again?

April 2, 2006 | By | No Comments

Newsweek has decided to put Web 2.0 on its cover this week. Is it just me, or does the irrational exuberance of a few years back seem like it’s just around the corner again? I’m as keen to see a return to fun and excitement on the Web as anyone. I just worry that we’re about to see a whole bunch of folks repeat the mistakes of the past. At least this time, it seems that a number of folks are thinking through how to make money on the deal, instead of this “selling a dollar for 90 cents and make it up on volume” silliness we all dealt with the first time through. Tim Leberecht (who I’ve just started reading, thanks to Technorati), has a viewpoint on this, too, recapping the recent thoughts here about whether Web 2.0 can live up to its hype. Check it out. It’s worth the read.

Tim Peter

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April 2, 2006

The two most exciting words in the English language…

April 2, 2006 | By | No Comments

Play ball!

Thank God baseball is back. White Sox-Indians tonight, and the Mets (God love ’em), tomorrow afternoon. Now if Barry Bonds would just strain a hammy or something before he has a chance to assault Ruth and Aaron’s records this season, much as he’s assaulted the integrity of the game, I’ll be even happier. Though, to be fair, he simply took advantage of a weak leadership within the league and a union run amok.

I’m reading Jeff Pearlman’s “The Bad Guys Won” right now. Fun stuff. Brings back many, many memories of the glory days. This new group of players doesn’t seem to have as many characters (though Delgado probably would have fit in), but they look like they might finally be able to give the Braves a run. Ahh… the joys of April. As the Green Day song goes, “wake me up when September ends.”

Tim Peter

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April 1, 2006

Clever way of measuring awareness of offline marketing online

April 1, 2006 | By | No Comments

I ran across this post on Fast Company this afternoon. Clever, actually. My favorite line is the part where they say, “In this case, advertising is trumping engineering in creating value.” That’s a bunch of hooey, though I think it’s a great example of strong advertising and marketing creating demand, at least for their tchotchke. The thing that I think is most interesting about the eBay Index, as Fast Company calls it, is its value as a metric of awareness. Clever, clever marketing idea, and an innovative way to build buzz around your product. Seth Godin would be proud (or better yet, read Trout and Ries. You’ll get more from it.)