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Tim Peter Thinks

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March 7, 2014

Tools of the Trade: A Process (and 6 Blogging Tools) I Can’t Live Without

March 7, 2014 | By | No Comments

Blog toolsI got an email the other day from Steve in Madison, WI, asking me for tips on how to blog more effectively and efficiently. Well, Steve — and everyone else — here’s what I do.

  1. It’s all about process. You can’t write regularly about any topic without a really solid process. I’ve developed mine over the course of some 9 years of blogging, plus loads of conversations with good friends like Mike Moran, Rob Petersen, and others about what works for them.
  2. Learning. First, I try to keep up on what’s happening in the world of e-commerce, digital marketing and marketing strategy. I talked a couple of weeks ago about using Feedly to keep track of my favorite news sources every week and keep a fresh list of ideas top of mind.
  3. Archiving. For news stories and viewpoints that I really like (or at least want to give more thought to, I use the web clipping feature in Evernote. Very handy, and it works across desktops, the Web, iOS, and Android, so I’ll always have my content where I want it.
  4. Brainstorming. I’m a big fan of outlining my ideas, though I especially like mind-mapping as a way of thinking through those ideas. These days, I’m using FreeMind (for the desktop) and SimpleMind+ (iOS). I may switch to using SimpleMind for the desktop, but I’ve got lots of all FreeMind maps, so… we’ll see.
  5. Planning. I develop a weekly and monthly content calendar. I haven’t switched to more robust tools yet, and still keep everything in an Excel spreadsheet (which you can download here).
  6. Composing. I love MarsEdit for writing and compiling my posts. No, like really. I’ve highlighted the program in my 2013 Holiday Gift Guide and bemoaned its absence in my list of essential iPad blogging apps way back in 2011. In fact, I’ve used MarsEdit for just about every post I’ve published since roughly 2007 or 2008. While you can definitely write and compose posts within WordPress’s editor, I find it’s easier to keep drafts on my local computer and only upload when they’re close to done. The editor integrates beautifully with WordPress and Tumblr (my two go-to publishing tools), as well as Squarespace, Blogger, Movable Type and lots more. I can’t imagine blogging without it. For images, I like iStockPhoto a lot. And I have a handful of little, but useful Python scripts I’ve put together over the years to help with things like compiling the top monthly posts quickly each month.
  7. Publishing. For me, it’s all WordPress, all the time (I run the self-hosted version at Dreamhost, though am really excited about their Dreampress offering). I’ve looked at most of the other big tools out there (and like many of them), but I’ve been using WordPress for most of my blogging life and can’t imagine changing now.
  8. Promoting. Finally, building a successful blog for your business entails promoting your work… but that’s another post. I’ll be sure and offer more details in the coming weeks, so stay tuned.

Anyway, that’s what works for me. Do you have a different process? Something you can’t live without? I’d love to hear more about it in the comments.

If you’re interested in learning more about the future of e-commerce and marketing via the social, local, mobile web, register to receive a special report I’ve produced in conjunction with hotel marketing firm Vizergy, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World.” While it’s targeted specifically at hotel and resort marketers, the lessons apply to just about any business. You can get your free copy of the report here.

You might also enjoy some of our past coverage of the social, local, mobile web and what it means for your business, including:

Tim Peter

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February 6, 2014

Your 10 Favorite Topics This Month (January 2014)

February 6, 2014 | By | No Comments

Top content on Thinks - January 2014

Wait a second… how in the world have we made it through the first month of 2014 already? Is it just me or did the last four weeks fly by? Oh… for you, too?

See, I knew it wasn’t just me.

Anyway, as I do every month, it’s time to take a moment and reflect on your favorite posts from the last month. Here’s what you all loved in January:

  1. By far, the most popular post in this past January was a Travel Tuesday entry that asked
    “What’s the State of Hotel Reputation Management?”
    Even more impressive when you consider that it only went live with 4 days left in the month. Of course, that’s no real surprise given that reputation management represents the single most effective way to improve your brand’s digital marketing.
  2. Another Travel Tuesday post takes the #2 slot, this one looking at the “4 Lessons You Need to Know from Google’s Affluent Traveler Report.” Good stuff.
  3. Another big entry from January explored “Trends Shaping E-commerce in 2014: Internet Everywhere.”
  4. “The Minimalist Guide to E-commerce Strategy” was another very popular post, this one coming in at #4.
  5. It’s no secret you all like reading about where digital is heading. Which explains the popularity of this post: “What Your Customers Expect from Mobile and E-commerce in 2014.”
  6. OK, so maybe Yahoo’s not in such bad shape after all. How else do you explain the popularity of this post that asks “Should You Still Listen to Marissa Mayer?” Apparently, you all feel Ms. Mayer’s got a few tricks up her sleeve yet, too.
  7. Mobile commerce will be huge. Well, not just huge, but HUGE. Emphasis, unfortunately, on “will be.” Despite some impressive growth—and significant projected going forward —today there’s still plenty of opportunity. Which led me to ask, “Why Isn’t Mobile Commerce Bigger?” And, you all seemed to find the answer interesting.
  8. For many marketers, search isn’t a marketing channel; it’s the marketing channel. But, given most business’s reliance on search (and, more specifically, Google), it’s worth asking, “Should Marketers Really Trust Google in 2014?”
  9. The Internet continues to shape organizations in myriad ways, including whether employees work in a centralized office, from home, while traveling, or some combination of all three. And, the popularity of this list of the “3 Key Things to Remember About Remote Work” suggests many companies continue to have questions about how to make remote work, um… work for their organizations.
  10. Finally, despite having only gone live with a couple of days left in the month, episode 59 of my Thinks Out Loud podcast, “Are Your Customers Ready for Mobile Commerce?” (along with episode 57, “Internet Strategy in a Changing World”), attracted lots of attention in January.

I’d also recommend you take a look at my slides for “Digital Marketing Directions: Three Trends Shaping 2014 Internet Marketing” on Slideshare. Not only was it the most popular presentation there this month, but it fleshes out many of the topics in this month’s top posts:

You can also register to receive a free copy of my special report, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World,” produced in conjunction with Vizergy, here. While it’s targeted to the hospitality industry specifically, most of the lessons apply across verticals.

You might also enjoy some of our past coverage of the social, local, mobile web and what it means for your business, including:

Tim Peter

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July 17, 2013

5 Top Tips from Thinks E-commerce and Marketing All-Stars

July 17, 2013 | By | No Comments

Tips from the Marketing All-StarsI wanted to follow up on yesterday’s list of the 2013 Marketing and E-commerce All-Stars by highlighting why various members made the list. While I don’t have an example from each member (for instance, Inbound.org and Tumblr don’t exactly lend themselves to this type of curation), it should offer a picture of what makes each of these folks special.

  1. Jeff Bullas wrote a piece asking “Are You Waiting to be Perfect Before You Start Your Blog?” Love this line: “If you don’t start then nothing will happen…. it is that simple.” Want more? I also love his piece on How to Unleash the Power of Content.”
  2. Mitch Joel builds on Jeff’s theme, asking What’s The Point In Commenting On Blogs? Mitch offers clear thinking in asking questions like this:

    “…the need to leave the digital equivalent of a high five doesn’t fit with my personality. It’s not an indication that I’m not appreciative of the discourse (quite the opposite, I’m extremely thankful that individuals read the content and feel compelled to comment). I’ve had people leave a comment, then post to Twitter that they have left a comment, then posted a link to the blog post with an additional comment on LinkedIn, Google + and more. There are many social media “experts” who feel that every comment must be acknowledged on a blog post. Does this mean that bloggers must also acknowledge those additional comments, shares and more on every other channel as well?

    Counter-intuitive, but well thought out. And illustrative of the kind of advice Mitch provides every day.

  3. Get Elastic is a bit more prescriptive, noting “only 25% of the 85 retail blogs we tracked in 2007 are still actively updated today” and offering alternatives in “Beyond Blogging: 13 Content Marketing Opportunities for Ecommerce.” Good stuff.
  4. Mike Moran looks at the overall value of content marketing (and many other techniques) when he asks “Does Brand Marketing Still Matter In The Digital Age?” As Mike says, “Digital marketing, in fact, is way more about marketing than about digital.” Worth noting, no?
  5. And let’s close out with Seth Godin. Seth makes a great point (as ever), in his post “The Thermostat And The Frying Pan”
    “There is significant pressure on marketers to get it done fast. And so the inclination to spend a lot, to race around, to turn the thermostat to its most extreme state. Yelling, basically. But all the yelling doesn’t build your brand faster. In fact, it might do quite the opposite. Trusted brands don’t get there by spending their whole budget on one Super Bowl ad.”

As ever, each of the Marketing and E-comemrce All Stars offers a ton of great information, tips, and deep thinking to help you grow your business. Check out the whole list and let their advice help you grow.

Interested in learning more about e-commerce and digital marketing? Register to receive a free copy of my new special report, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World,” produced in conjunction with Vizergy, here. While it’s targeted to the hospitality industry specifically, most of the lessons apply across verticals. And, if that’s not enough, you might also enjoy some of our past coverage of strategy, digital marketing, and e-commerce, including:

Tim Peter

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July 16, 2013

The 2013 Marketing and E-commerce All-Stars: The 9 Best E-commerce and Online Marketing Blogs

July 16, 2013 | By | 4 Comments

Blogging all starsWell, it’s that time of year again. As I’d mentioned yesterday, blogging remains an invaluable tool for business to attract customers and grow your business. Happily, a number of bloggers can help you learn how they’ve accomplished those feats, so you can too. So, for the third year running (and fourth overall), I give you the 2013 Marketing and E-commerce All-Star Bloggers:

  1. Future of Business & Communications (Gerd Leonhard). Leading off, we’ve got Gerd Leonhard, who calls himself FuturistGerd. His Future of Business & Communications blog offers countless insights into where technology, your customers, and, ultimately, your business is going. Well worth the read every day.
  2. Biznology Blog (Mike Moran, Editor). As I mentioned last year, Biznology is an All-Star team in its own right, featuring 18 bloggers focused on search and social and their influence on marketing, PR, and the enterprise. Full disclosure, I’m one of those 18 and am honored to be one. Happily, the other 17 do more than enough to overcome that and take home the honor. Required reading for marketers.
  3. Get Elastic Ecommerce Blog (Linda Bustos, Editor). Another holdover from last year, Get Elastic leads the way for e-commerce news and insights. Linda Bustos and her team do an amazing job of highlighting important trends in e-commerce and digital marketing to help you put those trends to work for your business.
  4. Six Pixels of Separation (Mitch Joel). I don’t know what to say about Mitch Joel. So I’ll let Marketing Magazine say it instead: “[the] Rock Star of Digital Marketing… one of North America’s leading digital visionaries.” So, yeah. There’s that. Mitch made the list last year and remains one of the most valuable players for me. Thought-provoking, inspiring, and all-around outstanding.
  5. Seth’s Blog (Seth Godin). Another brilliant marketer, Seth has inspired me for years. Even better, I met him at a Google event last year (see that handsome shot below), and, as it turns out, he’s not just smart, funny, and insightful; he’s a hell of a nice guy too. Tim Peter and Seth Godin
  6. Inbound Marketing Community (Community edited, founded by Rand Fishkin and Dharmesh Shah). From the creative minds leading HubSpot and Moz.com, Inbound.org aggregates the best inbound marketing insights from around the web every single day. An invaluable resource to marketers, it’s worth your time, every time.
  7. Jeff Bullas’s Blog (Jeff Bullas). Forbes, Huffington Post, AdAge and many others consider Jeff among the brightest minds in social media marketing. I quite agree. This author of “Blogging the Smart Way – How to Create and Market a Killer Blog with Social Media” offers loads of useful information about the social web and how to make it work for your business.
  8. Duct Tape Marketing Blog (John Jantsch). I think my man-crush on John Jantsch is pretty well established by now. Read his blog regularly and you’ll understand why. John talks about marketing small businesses with a real focus on the bottom line. And that focus is something we all can benefit from.
  9. Tumblr (social media tool). OK, this may seem like a cop-out, but if you’re not paying attention to Tumblr, you really ought to be. Seriously. There are so many good people to follow on Tumblr (among them, Gerd Leonhard, Search Engine Land, IBM Social Biz and others), it’s like your own private Interweb. Particularly since the death of Google Reader, Tumblr has become one of my go-to resources for news and information.

Well, Big Thinkers, there are your 2013 Marketing and E-commerce All-Star Bloggers. (Not, of course, that I don’t want to put in a plug for my very own Tim Peter Thinks, too). Check ‘em out (as well as the 2009, 2011, and 2012 lists), apply the lessons, and watch your game—and your business—improve.

Interested in learning more about e-commerce and digital marketing? Register to receive a free copy of my new special report, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World,” produced in conjunction with Vizergy, here. While it’s targeted to the hospitality industry specifically, most of the lessons apply across verticals. And, if that’s not enough, you might also enjoy some of our past coverage of strategy, digital marketing, and e-commerce, including:

Tim Peter

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July 15, 2013

3 Reasons Why Blogging Still Works for Marketing

July 15, 2013 | By | No Comments

Blogging still works as a marketing techniqueIt’s no secret I’ve long been a fan of blogging for business. And, for the most part, I still am [*].

But in prep for announcing this year’s Blogging All-Star Lineup (you can see last year’s list here), I thought I’d give you three reasons why blogging still makes sense for your business:

  1. Your customers have questions that need answering. Customers, regardless of what they’re looking for, continue to begin their journey with search. And those that ask their friends (either IRL folks, or those they know only through social networks), typically rely on well-informed individuals. Guess where those well-informed folks get their information.
  2. You have answers for those questions. I’m sure you do. You don’t have to be perfect. You don’t have to be world-class (though, it helps). What you do have to do is a.) know more than your customers do and, b.) don’t overstate what you do know. A big part of your brand story is based on what’s true about you. Your customers are smart. They’ll see through BS. Just tell the truth about where you’re able to help and the people who need that help will find you.
  3. You want to rank well in search engines when people ask those questions. Not much to say about this one.

Blogging isn’t a panacea. It isn’t a silver bullet. It isn’t the Holy Grail. But in an era when many happily flit from technique to technique in hopes of finding a panacea/silver bullet/Holy Grail, it’s amazing how effective a well-structured blog that focuses on answering your customers’ needs works for many, many businesses.

Now, check back tomorrow when I announce this year’s Marketing and E-commerce Blogging All-Stars, the folks who share what they know to help your business grow.

Interested in learning more about e-commerce and digital marketing? Register to receive a free copy of my new special report, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World,” produced in conjunction with Vizergy, here. While it’s targeted to the hospitality industry specifically, most of the lessons apply across verticals. And, if that’s not enough, you might also enjoy some of our past coverage of strategy, digital marketing, and e-commerce, including:

[*] – Of course exceptions exist. But, for many businesses, I think you should probably blog for your business. (I’m open to hearing about edge cases; let me know your reasons against in the comments).

Tim Peter

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April 10, 2013

Share This: 5 Tips You Must Learn to Create Sharable Content | Biznology

April 10, 2013 | By | No Comments

Getting others to share your contentContent marketing matters. I’ve said that time and again. But too often, we focus more on the “content” part and not enough on the “marketing” part.

Now, without content, you’ve got nothing to market, so a somewhat skewed ratio makes a certain sense. But at some point, you’ve got to promote your content — or even better, get others to promote it for you. My latest post for Mike Moran’s Biznology blog, “Share This: 5 Tips You Must Learn to Create Sharable Content” explores exactly how you can accomplish that latter task for your content.

And for your business.

Check it out.

Interested in more? Sign up for our free newsletter and get more information on how to build your social, local, mobile marketing strategy. And, if you’ve got a minute, you might enjoy some past coverage of content marketing, including:

Tim Peter

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April 4, 2013

Tim Peter

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March 25, 2013

3 Key Blogging Tips Learned from 1,400 Blog Posts

March 25, 2013 | By | 2 Comments

Blogging tipsToday’s a milestone of a sort here on Tim Peter Thinks. This marks the 1,400th post ever published on the blog. Now, 1,400 isn’t a magical number like 1,000 or 500 or even 100. But it’s a pretty cool number in its own right, representing well over 7 years of posting.

So, in honor of the 1,400 posts on Tim Peter Thinks, I figured I’d share a few lessons I’ve learned about blogging for a small business:

  1. Ask customers to do something. As I mentioned yesterday, asking visitors to subscribe to your email list is a terrific idea. So is getting them to read another post. Or visit your products/services. But ask your readers to do something—anything—that contributes value to your business. Oh, and while you’re at it, you should subscribe to our free newsletter to get even more tips like these from the blog.
  2. Guest posts are great. Except when they’re not. I love my guest bloggers. And I’m thrilled to get amazing content from such great writers as Nii Ahene, Jackie Codair, Jessica Sanders, and Megan Totka. At the same time, it’s amazing how many guest blogger requests I get from people who clearly have never read my blog. Nor my tips on how to be a great guest blogger (which, you’d think was a direct giveaway). Whether you’re looking to be a guest blogger or looking to get people to blog for you, make sure the readers benefit first. Otherwise, the relationship is doomed from the start.
  3. The secret to a successful blog? There is no secret. Blogs are incredibly valuable for small businesses. But they’re a decent amount of work, too, if you want to do it right. Anyone who tells you there’s a secret to it probably isn’t being entirely honest. Now, there are ways to improve (and many of them aren’t terribly difficult). And you can (and should) always look for ways to blog faster, cheaper, better. But, few things will improve your blog more than doing the work, banging out posts, day after day, week after week. It’s hard not to get good at something if you put in a little time and effort. I don’t think I’m a great blogger. But after 1,400 posts, I’m beginning to think I’m better than I was.

Small business blogging isn’t always a walk in the park. In fact, it can be a fair bit of work. But if you keep at it, learn from your mistakes—or, even better, learn from others—blogging can benefit your small business greatly. I hope you’ve got 1,400 posts (or more) in you. And I hope to see you here for our next 1,400.

Interested in more? Sign up for our free newsletter and get more information on how to build your social, local, mobile marketing strategy. And, if you’ve got a minute, you might enjoy some past coverage on small business blogging:

Tim Peter

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August 15, 2012

WordPress.com Lacks a Surprising Feature

August 15, 2012 | By | No Comments

Wordpress logoEarly in the week, I posted a review of Google’s 2012 Traveler “Road to Decision” presentation here on Tim Peter Thinks, instead of on the Travel Stuff blog where you might expect it. And in my post yesterday about using more than one blog platform, I said I’d explain why.

Many of you know that WordPress offers itself in two versions:

  • WordPress.com, a fully-hosted, cloud-based blogging platform requiring little technical knowledge to run.
  • WordPress.org, a self-hosted version that requires separate web hosting, configuration, and (often), deeper technical knowledge to set-up and run.

For purposes of clarity in this post, I’m going to nickname WordPress.com “dot-com,” and WordPress.org “self-hosted.”

Each platform has a number of pros and cons (something I’ll detail in a future post), but the ease of implementation for the dot-com version is its main selling point, while the customization within the self-hosted version is its big win.

Travel Stuff runs on the dot-com version of WordPress. And I run Tim Peter Thinks on the self-hosted WordPress, using Dreamhost as my hosting company and the Thesis theme to manage the look and feel. Up until now, I’ve considered moving Thinks to the dot-com version of WordPress so I don’t have to worry about all the details any longer.

Unfortunately, it turns out the dot-com version of WordPress lacks a surprising feature.

As part of my post on Monday, I embedded Google’s presentation via an iFrame. For those of you not familiar with HTML, an iFrame is a small piece of code that loads a web page (or, more typically, a small part of a web page) from another site. In this case, the iFrame contained Google’s presentation. It’s a very common way to share content across the web. In fact, I host many of my presentations on Slideshare and frequently include them in posts (for example, here and here).

I was very surprised when I reviewed the draft version of my post on WordPress.com and found that the Google presentation was missing. And even more surprised when I couldn’t find a work-around.

The problem is, the dot-com version of WordPress doesn’t allow iFrames in your content (or embed tags or JavaScript). While you can include content from other sites (YouTube and Slideshare, for instance) in your posts, you can’t use an iFrame to do it. There are good security reasons why they don’t allow these tags, but I was disappointed I couldn’t find a workaround.

Fortunately, because I also have access to the self-hosted version of WordPress, I opted to move the post to my main blog instead.

Now, should this be a deal-breaker for you if you’re looking at WordPress.com? Probably not. In fact, I’m still a fan of WordPress.

But, if you include content from other sites on a regular basis, you probably want to look at what WordPress.com allows and doesn’t before you opt to use it every day.


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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Tim Peter

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August 14, 2012

How Many Blogs Does Your Business Need?

August 14, 2012 | By | One Comment

Blog tools by kpwerkerLong-time readers of Tim Peter Thinks may not know this, but I actually run two blogs (well, if you want to be completely accurate, I run a bunch of blogs, but let’s keep this simple for now). My main blog, Tim Peter Thinks is the blog you’re reading right now and can be reached at the following URL: timpeter.com/blog.[1]

My other blog, called Travel Stuff (I know, great name, right?), focuses on, well… travel stuff and is available via travelstuff.timpeter.com[2]. Specifically, I use it to look at marketing, e-commerce and distribution in the hospitality and travel industries. These represent a significant customer segment for my business and have somewhat divergent needs from e-commerce and online marketing generally.

While the two blogs share many similar ideas, it’s handy to keep them separate — and, as I’ve mentioned in a past post, it’s a pain in the, um… tuchus to consolidate them into a single blog.

So, here’s the question: Should you have more than one blog for your business?

And, here’s a quick answer: Probably not.

Most businesses should focus on creating one really strong blog that connects well with their customers. If you’re not sure how to do that, take a look at my “Small Business Blogging Guide”.

Now, I realize that I’m telling you “do what I say, not what I do,” so let me explain the cases where more than one blog makes sense.

When Multiple Blogs (May) Make Sense

There are at least 2 reasons why you might consider having multiple blogs:

  1. You serve multiple distinct customers. This is actually more common than you might think. For example, in the travel industry, the needs of business travelers, travel agents, and “ordinary” consumers (usually called leisure or transient segments, if you’re curious), often require distinct messages. Similarly, companies like IBM market to C-suite executives and developers across a variety of industries. Assuming you want to have a blog for each group, it’s unlikely only one would successfully service the needs of such widely divergent groups.
  2. You offer more than one distinct brand in the marketplace. This often (but not always) follows from #1 above. For instance, Chrysler offers separate blogs for its Jeep, Fiat, Ram Trucks, and Chrysler brands. Additionally, many independent hotels and hotel chains set up distinct blogs even when owned by the same parent company.

While it may be obvious, reason #1 is why Travel Stuff exists separately from Thinks[3][4].

The key here is that, if you’re going to have multiple blogs, the reasons have to make sense for your customers and your brand. Even with the examples above, many companies effectively address the needs of their customers and their brands using a single blog. For instance, Ford does a great job of offering distinct messages to distinct customers about its many brands while directing customers to a single site, Social.Ford.com (run by the exceptionally savvy Scott Monty [@scottmonty on Twitter]).

So, how many blogs does your business need? Well, at least one, certainly. But if you’re thinking of having more than one, make sure you’re doing it for your customers first.


Footnotes

[1] — Technically, Tim Peter Thinks can be reached via timpeter.com/blog, timpeterthinks.com, thinksblog.com and a handful of other domains. But, from a branding perspective, timpeter.com/blog is the only URL I promote.

[2] — Yes, I know subdirectories are better than subdomains. I’ve explained why I use the travelstuff.timpeter.com subdomain for that blog as part of as part of my series on subdomains vs. subdirectories for branding and for SEO.

[3] — Of course, this then begs the question why I put yesterday’s post about Google’s 2012 Traveler report on Thinks instead of Travel Stuff. I’ll get to that tomorrow. Promise.

[4] — There’s at least one more reason for having multiple blogs, though it’s far more rare than either of the two main ones above. In my case, I’m continually evaluating blogging platforms to serve the needs of my customers. So some of those “bunch of blogs” I mentioned way up above exist only to help me (and others like me) learn about different platforms. In this case, “do what I say, not what I do” reflects that my business model is very different from my clients’ .


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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