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August 20, 2015

What Do Your Customers Really Know About You? – Thinks Out Loud Episode 134

August 20, 2015 | By | No Comments

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What Do Your Customers Really Know About You? - Thinks Out Loud Episode 134

What Do Your Customers Really Know About You? – Headlines and Show Notes

You might also want to check out these slides I had the pleasure of presenting recently about how to lead mobile-focused digital transformation within large organizations (a topic we’ve been talking about a fair bit lately). Here are the slides for your reference:

Contact information for the podcast: podcast@timpeter.com

Technical details: Recorded using an Audio-Technica AT2035 studio condenser microphone through a Mackie Onyx Blackjack USB recording interface into Logic Express 9 for the Mac.

Running time: 13m 47s

You can subscribe to Thinks Out Loud in iTunes [iTunes link], subscribe via our dedicated podcast RSS feed (or better yet, given that Google has now killed Reader, sign up for our free newsletter). You can also download/listen to the podcast here on Thinks using the player below:

Tim Peter

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July 20, 2015

5 Warning Signs That Your Website Sucks

July 20, 2015 | By | No Comments

Does your website suck? Does it meet your customers' needs?Does your website suck? I’m not asking to be mean. Really. Building a website that meets the needs of your business and your customers is a tricky balancing act. You want to project a robust, yet friendly brand. You want to make sure the site is usable, but also good looking. You want to promote your company without getting in your customers’ way. You need to represent the needs of disparate internal stakeholders, but you don’t want to drive the design and functionality based on your org chart. You want Google, Bing, and other search engines to find your site and boost its rankings in their results. You want your customers to like, link, and share your content with their friends, family, fans, and followers among their various social networks. And, of course, you want it to look world-class without breaking your budget.

Sounds simple, right?

Well… not really. While no one set of tips and tricks guarantees a perfect site designed to achieve an optimal balance among these disparate demands, a few best practices can ensure your site works well in most cases. If your site exhibits more than one of these common warning signs, it’s a pretty good indication your website sucks. Here’s what those warning signs are —and how you can prevent them.

Meager Images

Does your website offer clear, crisp images, designed to work well on “Retina-caliber” displays? Do those images show your product and services clearly? Or do your customers have to lean in close and reach for reading glasses every time they want to see a picture (even if they don’t wear glasses)? On the web today, a picture is worth a thousand words. Poor quality, low resolution images — or too few images overall — make it difficult for your customers to truly see what they’re buying when they buy from you. Invest in high-quality, high-resolution images that illustrate your offering clearly. Google’s recent emphasis on images in search, including Carousel and Business View underscore how seriously the search giant takes images as part of the overall consumer experience. And don’t forget the move towards image-sharing in social, including Instagram, Pinterest, and, yes, even Twitter (images are proven to make social posts more shareable). Your customers value images. Make sure your site does too.

Poor Mobile Experience

OK. Before you read any further, grab your mobile phone (or open a new tab if you’re reading this on mobile), and navigate to your website. What does it look like? Can you read the text? Do the images appear clearly? Can your customers find key calls-to-action like your address, phone number, or add-to-cart? No? Well, you’re not alone. Research from Foresee Results (highlighted here) shows that “…functionality on mobile apps and sites was the area for biggest improvement across… mobile retailers” and that “…mobile is affecting direct sales contribution and purchases in other channels, too.” Those effects can be negative, too, if your customers can’t find what they’re looking for when on their mobile device. Responsive sites rank better for SEO, usually cost less to maintain than a dedicated mobile site, and, as a general rule, work better across a wider range of devices. Oh, and they help your customers, too. What’s not to love?

No Web Analytics

An old consulting saw states, “You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” Time and again I see companies running their websites without any web analytics in place. Which means, of course, that they’re not really managing their sites. They’re just guessing what customers care about — or don’t. If your site lacks analytics, take a few minutes and have your administrator at least place tags for Google Analytics on your site. Today. Once you’re able to measure, you’ll be able to manage your site so much more effectively. And you’ll begin to put your site to work for your business more effectively too. What should you measure? Well, I’m glad you asked… High Bounce Rate Bounce rate is what happens when customers view a single page on your site without drilling deeper into your information. A high bounce rate is the kiss of death for most businesses, as it means your website wasn’t good enough to answer your customers’ questions without leaving them looking for a better answer — especially if they look to a competitor. Even worse, you might have paid — with money, time, or resources — to bring those folks to your site. That’s pretty much the definition of “sucks” in my book. Identify pages on your site that have both lots of traffic and a high bounce rate, then set to work on improving those pages (look to copy, headlines, images, and calls-to-action first). Getting these pages to not suck should be your web team’s #1 priority, even ahead of SEO, PPC, or email marketing. Driving traffic to a page that’s just going to cause customers to bounce is a waste of customer goodwill. So don’t do that.

Limited Traffic Sources

I once worked on a site that got almost 80% of its traffic from organic search and a big chunk of that organic search traffic from a relatively small set of keywords. Guess what happened. Search traffic fell during the economic downturn (it was a luxury products company), and the overall business suffered. As one company executive put it after I showed them the issue, “Google sneezed and we caught a cold.” You’ve all heard the adage about not putting all your eggs in one basket. Well, the same holds true for your website. Look at the sources driving traffic to your site, then build a plan to grow each of the following categories:

  • Natural search
  • Referrals
  • Direct navigation
  • Email
  • And, if you’ve got the budget, paid search.

You’re looking for both quantity and quality here, so don’t just jump on spammy link-building techniques or wasteful spend solely to get additional traffic. Instead, focus on quality partners and proven tactics to increase across and within each of these key categories. While it can’t guarantee you won’t “catch a cold” when someone upstream sneezes, it will help you spread the risk and improve your “immunity” to any changes in the marketplace.

Conclusion

You’ll notice I didn’t talk about conversion rate or returning visitors or more detailed metrics for your site. It’s not that those are unimportant; they are. Very important, in fact. But it’s more important that you get the basics right first. Focus on these five areas to start with, then look at building a more detailed picture of your customers’ online behavior. Building a high-quality, customer-focused website is an ongoing process that requires constant attention and clear goals. Look at where your customers come from, what they’re trying to accomplish, and how well your pages support their goals at each step along the way. It won’t guarantee you’ll win every sale, every day. But it will help you attract and retain more customers in the long run. And that surely doesn’t suck.

Do you want learn even more about how your customers’ changing behavior shapes e-commerce and marketing? Be sure an register to receive a special report I’ve produced in conjunction with hotel marketing firm Vizergy, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World.” While it’s targeted specifically at hotel and resort marketers, the lessons apply to just about any business. You can get your free copy of the report here.

You can also check out these slides and video from my recent webinar, “Digital Marketing Directions: Three Key Trends Driving Your Marketing Next Year”:

And, finally, you might want to take a look at some of our past coverage of the e-commerce, mobile commerce, and digital marketing overall, including:

Note: A version of this post originally appeared on Biznology, where Tim Peter writes a monthly column.
Tim Peter

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February 26, 2015

How Customer Data Drives Satisfaction and Increased Revenues

February 26, 2015 | By | No Comments

Customer data leads to customer satisfaction and increased conversionOver the last few days, we’ve spent a bunch of time looking at who owns your customer, how great hotels use customer data to own their guests’ experience, and why you need to own the data to own the customer, too. Here’s even more good news: eMarketer research shows that collecting customer data can seriously help drive satisfaction and, ultimately, increased revenue for you. Money quote:

“October 2014 research by Forbes Insights, in association with Turn, identified something else retailers could do on their end to boost customer satisfaction: data collection. Among US retail marketing executives, 50% said data-driven marketing had helped them achieve a competitive advantage in customer satisfaction.”

Sadly, it ain’t all sunshine and rainbows:

“On the flipside, while half had seen success with data-driven marketing, this means that the other half of retailers still had to improve—or begin—their efforts… Few online retailers actually track customer satisfaction, though, based on Retention Science polling conducted in July 2014, indicating another area for improvement. Just 31.7% of US online retailers studied said they actively tracked customer satisfaction rate—the second-lowest response.”

What are they doing?

“…respondents were more focused on sales-related data, such as conversion rate (88.5%) and average order value (71.2%). While increased consumer shopping and spending is great, making sure shoppers are happy is also important—otherwise retailers risk losing them and their business.”

Now that’s not a bad thing, in and of itself. Hell, recent studies show far too many marketing leaders don’t use analytics near enough—or at all. There’s way too much “gut instinct” out there and not enough “cold, hard facts.” So, that’s good, I guess.

But, if you’re only measuring data about conversion and AOV, without understanding more about why your customers choose you, you run a very high risk of them not choosing you.

Ultimately, you can never truly “own” your customers. The decision to buy—or not—rests solely in their hands, their heads, and their hearts. All you can do is help them decide you’re the best choice. And any data that helps you interpret what “the best choice” means for them is a very, very good thing. Collecting customer data drives satisfaction among your customers—and can help drive revenues for you.

If you want to learn even more about how changing customer behavior shapes e-commerce and marketing, be sure an register to receive a special report I’ve produced in conjunction with hotel marketing firm Vizergy, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World.” While it’s targeted specifically at hotel and resort marketers, the lessons apply to just about any business. You can get your free copy of the report here.

You can also check out these slides and video from my recent webinar, “Digital Marketing Directions: Three Key Trends Driving Your Marketing Next Year”:

And, finally, you might want to take a look at some of our past coverage of the e-commerce, mobile commerce, and digital marketing overall, including:

Tim Peter

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February 25, 2015

Want to Own the Customer? Own the Data – Thinks Out Loud Episode 112

February 25, 2015 | By | No Comments

Own the data to own the customer

Want to Own the Customer? Own the Data – Headlines and Show Notes

You might also enjoy the slides from my recent webinar, Digital Marketing Directions: Key Trends Driving Your Marketing Next Year,:

Contact information for the podcast: podcast@timpeter.com

Technical details: Recorded using an Audio-Technica AT2035 studio condenser microphone through a Mackie Onyx Blackjack USB recording interface into Logic Express 9 for the Mac.

Running time: 14m 29s

You can subscribe to Thinks Out Loud in iTunes [iTunes link], subscribe via our dedicated podcast RSS feed (or better yet, given that Google has now killed Reader, sign up for our free newsletter). You can also download/listen to the podcast here on Thinks using the player below:

Tim Peter

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April 9, 2013

What Are Your Customers Actually Buying? (Travel Tuesday)

April 9, 2013 | By | No Comments

Customer satisfactionTravel marketing — as well as service marketing generally — depends on providing your customers a great experience every time for a pretty simple reason: The experience is the product. It’s not like there’s an object that “leaves the store” with them. Airlines, in particular, are learning this lesson the hard way right now as recent research shows declining customer satisfaction… despite improving operational execution.

This need to get it right, to at minimum meet your customers expectations every time, is the topic of this week’s Travel Tuesday post on TravelStuff, “What Are Your Customers Actually Buying?” Check it out.

Interested in more? Sign up for our free newsletter and get more information on how to build your social, local, mobile marketing strategy. And, if you’ve got a minute, you might enjoy some past coverage of customer experience in marketing, including:

Tim Peter

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January 29, 2013

Is Permission Marketing Still Relevant?

January 29, 2013 | By | One Comment

Mistakes happenYesterday I recapped my Finding and Following Your Customer’s Digital Footprint Twitter chat and I mentioned the following points:

  • Have a clear sense of what’s your data (aggregate usage information, opens, clicks, shares, retweets, etc). vs. customers’.
  • All personally identifiable information (PII) belongs to customers, always. Handle with care.
  • If you’re uncomfortable telling customers how you plan to use their data, ask yourself whether you should collect it at all.

Well, I got an email asking why these concepts are so important. I’m not going to quote the email in full (I want to protect the guilty on this one), but, as the writer asked,

“I’m not saying I want to be ‘evil,’ but what’s evil about trying to grow my business? How am I supposed to contact prospects if I’ve got to ask their permission all the time? Isn’t the point to drive more revenue?”

I’m going to answer these in reverse.

First, of course the point is to drive more revenue (assuming, of course, you’re a revenue-focused organization; if you’re not, insert your “business” metrics where you see “revenue,” “profit,” etc.)

But the point isn’t to drive more revenue today with no thought for tomorrow.

Yes, we live in an instant gratification society, one focused on immediate earnings and early exits. I myself am fond of saying that marketing is next quarter’s sales. But you can’t sacrifice your future for short-term gain (well, you can; I’m just saying it’s a bad idea).

This isn’t just “touchy-feely,” holier-than-thou stuff, either (though I’m getting to that in a minute. There’s a practical reason for this approach. Finding customers is expensive. Really expensive, in fact. So a customer who buys from you just once isn’t a great investment. Instead, you want to cultivate longer-term relationships with people, earn their trust, and also earn their repeat business. It’s much simpler to sell to people you’ve sold to before. And that’s much easier if you’ve demonstrated that you take their concerns into consideration.

It happens to be the right thing to do. But it’s also a good business.

Now, the second reason is this: It’s not your data.

Your customers entrust you with a limited amount of information, for a specific purpose. You should use it for that purpose and only for that purpose. If they want it back, or want to opt out, or want to move on and not hear from you any more, that’s their right. How would you like it if I borrowed your car, then wouldn’t give it back when you needed it? Or if I trashed it, spilling chili dogs and Diet Cherry Pepsi all over the floor?

So why do you think it’s OK to treat their data that way?

Seth Godin once wrote a fantastic book, called “Permission Marketing” about this very topic. It’s a little dated, but it’s well-worth the read. For me, it’s still the gold standard. And the reason is because, like all fundamental truths, they really don’t change over time.

So, yes, work to grow your business. Do what you can to drive your revenues. And feel free to push for better and better results. But do it in a way that’s good for your customer today and good for your business tomorrow.

Interested in more? Sign up for our free newsletter and get more information on how to build your social, local, mobile marketing strategy.

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January 16, 2013

The Race You Can’t Win

January 16, 2013 | By | One Comment

Battered dollarI’m giving a talk next week about price transparency on the Internet (something I’ve talked about lots and lots before and something I touched on in yesterday’s Biznology webinar). During that webinar I referenced what I call “the race to zero” and why it’s such a bad idea for businesses both online and offline.

Here’s what happens:

  1. You experience soft business results. Maybe you have a bad month, maybe it’s a bad quarter. But you know this for sure: it’s bad. We’ve all been there and, as you well know, it’s no fun.
  2. You reduce prices. Sure, you call it a sale, a special promotion, what-have-you. But it all amounts to the same thing. You lower your advertised price to your customers.
  3. You cut service or marketing to pay for the lower price. Well, you’re already having a bad month, right? Why keep funneling good money after bad. Again, we’ve all been there.
  4. Your short term sales improve. Or not. In the old days, you could get away with this a lot more easily. Unfortunately, today, your competitors can see your prices just as easily as customers can. So while you might gain some share in the immediate term, almost as immediately…
  5. Your competitors respond. They drop their prices. They launch a sale, offer a discount, a deal, eating into your (short-lived and possibly non-existent) advantage.
  6. Customer expectations shift. Experience suffers. You (and your competitors) just told your customers that your product isn’t worth what it used to be worth. Oh, and because you cut either service or marketing to pay for the new lower price, they’re right.
  7. The result: Soft business results. And thus the not-so-merry-go-round feeds back on itself.

Back before the Internet, you could sometimes run this race just long enough to get through a tough time. Not too many customers found out about the lower price. Your competitors were slower to respond. Folks who got a great deal couldn’t shout it out on Twitter and Facebook. Customers who got lousy service couldn’t tell their friends and family and fans and followers — essentially their whole world — on Yelp, TripAdvisor, Angie’s List, or anything like that. And maybe you got away with it long enough to deal with a short-term downturn.

Today?

It’s a death spiral.

And mobile only makes it worse.

The best way to win this race is not to run it at all.

Your customers expect good value for their (hard-earned, stretched-thin, beaten-to-a-pulp) dollar (pound, Euro, Yen, what-have-you).

Instead of running a race to zero, consider this:

  1. Offer value-adds, not discounts. When you enhance a product, service, or experience with something your customer values (and, ideally, doesn’t cost you much), you engender goodwill and good word-of-mouth without devaluing your primary offering. And you make it harder for competitors to respond with a like-for-like offering.
  2. Tell your story. A good brand story helps customers answer one of their most important questions: “Why should I buy from you?” And a great brand story helps explain why you’re worth a few dollars more than the guy across the street. Start building your brand story before a downturn (or today, if you haven’t already). As the old saying goes, “The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second-best time is now.”
  3. Plan ahead. The economy seems to be slowly climbing out of the hole we dug a few years back. Which means now is the perfect time to plan ahead for the next downturn. Make sure you’re not committing common mistakes many marketing plans suffer from. And remember that things aren’t ever as bad as they seem.

Downturns happen. That’s true today and will be true tomorrow. No matter how good things get, they can always go wrong. But, by the same token, even the toughest times end eventually. The key is to get through them as quickly and as effectively as you can. Which is why you don’t want to wear yourself out running a race to zero.


If you can help those dealing with the after-effects of Hurricane Sandy, please visit the American Red Cross.

Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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September 19, 2012

Speed (Or Lack Thereof) Kills

September 19, 2012 | By | No Comments

Speed killsI don’t talk about site performance very often. But today’s news about Bank of America’s website challenges today brought it top of mind. If you don’t know what’s happening, here’s what CNN had to say:

“Bank of America’s website was sluggish and intermittently unavailable for many users on Tuesday, in an outage that the bank hadn’t explained by the end of the day.

Bank of America (BAC, Fortune 500) spokesman Mark Pipitone said the company is ‘working to ensure full availability,’ and that online banking is available ‘although some customers may experience occasional slowness.'”

I worked for Charles Schwab during the dot-com boom. And I remember our sites occasionally having performance issues due to the extreme demand from customers to execute ever more trades, ever more quickly. Unfortunately, whenever we had problems, it both irritated customers, cost us money, and hurt our reputation (the only consolation was that most other online brokers were having the same problem, so customers didn’t have many better options from which to choose — I’m not saying that’s the right approach, merely that it was the reality at the time).

Of course, you don’t have to be a financial services company to experience poor site performance. There’s a memorable moment in “The Social Network” where Mark Zuckerberg loses his mind on Eduardo Savarin after Savarin stops payment on their hosting account, potentially knocking the nascent site offline entirely. First Zuckerberg ensures the sites remain online and, later in the movie, ensures Savarin isn’t in a position to do it again.

If you’re a retailer, you probably vacuum and dust your stores regularly, restock shelves, and ensure easy access to merchandise. If you’re a restaurant, you wipe the tables and sweep the floors, polish the silverware, and relight the candles. If you’re a hotel, you make the beds, change the towels, and clean the bathrooms.

And, if you’re a website, you do everything you can to ensure your customers have a speedy and uninterrupted experience. Speed matters. It’s not a technical concern. It’s basic customer service.


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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September 17, 2012

A Simple Technique for Product Innovation

September 17, 2012 | By | No Comments

E-commerce innovationEllen Isaacs has an interesting article over on GigaOm looking at the power of observation to help you figure out what your customers want. Ellen uses a technique called “ethnographic research,” though, with no offense intended, it could just as easily be called, “following customers around to see what they do.” [Updated to fix broken link.]

Why should you care? As Ellen notes,

“…ethnographic studies likely save businesses far more time than they take. These observations and analysis can reveal insights that shift projects toward demonstrated problems.”

I’ve conducted a number of ethnographic studies in my career and can tell you exactly how effective they are. In an example I’ve shared in the past, my team and I learned that the photos on the website we ran were far too small. Simply replacing our product images with larger photos increased revenues by more than 10% annually. And keep in mind this was a company delivering many, many millions in online revenue each year. Watching customers using your site for even a few minutes dramatically illustrates where you’re doing well — and where you’re going off the rails.

I’ve had clients ask me, “Well, isn’t it just easier to survey our customers?”

Almost always, the answer is “No,” for two reasons:

  1. Observation is easy. Whereas putting a survey together and finding the right folks to survey can take a fair bit of time, tools like UserTesting.com and OpenHallway.com let you see how customers use your site and shopping cart — or your competitors’ — easily and inexpensively [I have no commercial relationship with either site — I’m just a raving fan]. Yes, you still have to put together a use case. But I find that asking representative customers to use your site to try and buy your product is a much simpler process than crafting questions designed to find out why they’re not buying.
  2. Customers lie. Now, I don’t mean to impugn the integrity of your customers. They don’t mean to lie; they just can’t help it. Anyone who’s spent any time observing customers in action will tell you that a gaping chasm often exists between what customers say they’ll do and what they actually do. Watching customers shows you exactly how they’re using your site, where they’re struggling and, often, what you can do to fix it.

Of course, once you’ve watched your customers, it’s important to take those learnings and apply them. But it’s much easier to make the changes that will help your customer accomplish their goals if you actually understand where they’re working. And where they’re not.


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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June 21, 2012

The Golden Age of Web Performance by Josh Fraser

June 21, 2012 | By | No Comments

I’ve talked before about the value of speed for your website, but it’s challenging to know what’s slowing your site down. Happily, Josh Fraser, CEO at Torbit has offered this post on the Golden Age of Web Performance and is offering a free trial of Torbit Insight to Thinks readers. Here’s what Josh has to say.

We live in a world where millions of websites that you enjoy and find relevant vie for your attention every day. And although the web keeps expanding, everyone is busy and there are only so many hours in the day. We’ve entered the Golden Age of Web Performance.

In the early days of the web, your average visitor was thrilled that you simply had a website, as businesses and individuals carved out a piece of the web for themselves. But now we have so many options to get the same information, similar products, similar opinions. If your website is slow, your visitors are going to go somewhere else.

Let’s say you have one visitor who landed on your eCommerce website because they’re looking for a new beach blanket for the summer. She wants one that’s yellow or blue and made of organic materials. Searching around on blogs or on Pinterest, she comes across a blanket that you sell. She clicks the links.

And she sits.

And sits.

And sits.

All this while the page loads and she doesn’t get any closer to buying that blanket from you. Every second that she’s waiting to buy that beach blanket, is money that’s slipping away from you and that sale. So instead, she closes your the tab in her browser with your site and opens up Amazon. She searches and finds a blue beach blanket made from organic materials. And then she buys it. Amazon loaded more quickly. They got the sale.

Over 80% of web performance is based on front-end assets — HTML, CSS, JavaScript and images. In this Golden Age of Web Performance, we need to focus on and optimize those in order to make more sales, retain more eyeballs and earn more profit. And as mobile device use skyrockets and people use their smaller screens to do more, getting your page in front of them is more important than ever.

The first step to keeping those visitors — those prospective customers — is understanding and measuring your speed. It’s seeing what each and every user is experiencing, not just a sample of them that gives you the most optimistic picture.

We built Torbit Insight because we want to help you see and understand your users’ load times, to understand their impatience and their pain. You may never get that visitor back if you’re not measuring the front end and how every single user is experiencing their individual load time. Because once you measure, you can optimize, graduate into the ranks of the leaders in the Golden Age of Web Performance and win.

Josh fraser headshot Josh Fraser is the co-founder and CEO of Torbit. Torbit makes websites faster by automating front-end optimizations that are proven to increase the speed of your website. Try Torbit Insight today and understand how page speed is affecting your conversion rate, bounce rate and revenue.


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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