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Tim Peter Thinks

Tim Peter

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January 14, 2008

Yahoo Travel switches from Travelocity to FareChase as its default travel search engine

January 14, 2008 | By | No Comments

Erick Schonfeld at TechCrunch analyzes what led Yahoo to use FareChase instead of Travelocity for its default travel search engine. Looks like the market for price searching is heating up just as the economy begins slowing.

Tim Peter

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December 28, 2007

The T-List of Travel blogs

December 28, 2007 | By | No Comments

Matthieu at Radar Blog first created this T-List of Travel blogs (and I took the most current list from Jens Thraenhart).

Enjoy!

General Travel Blogs

Travel Industry Blogs

Foreign Language Travel Blogs

French Travel Blogs

Italian Travel Blogs

Dutch Travel Blogs

German Travel Blogs

Spanish Travel Blogs

Tim Peter

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December 3, 2007

Fred Wilson: Why Google will own the mobile, local web

December 3, 2007 | By | No Comments

Is the picture of the mobile, local web (the backyard web) beginning to take shape? With over 3 billion mobile phones in consumers’ hands and with increasing access to valuable mobile services, like Google’s new geolocation services, it seems likely consumers will start expecting tools like these. How ready is your business to have your customers find you via their mobile?

Tim Peter

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November 27, 2007

Mike Moran on Toyota's – and every other business' – social media "problem"

November 27, 2007 | By | No Comments

Mike Moran points out a great social media case study. The thing to note is that most companies – Toyota included, in this case – miss the point of social media’s “dangers.” The problem isn’t that customers can say anything. It’s that customers can see everything. Toyota has no issue being green, so long as that green is opaque. It’s transparent green that it’s having problems with. The company’s response is that of an opaque company mindset, while its customers live in an increasingly transparent world. Even in today’s world, most customers are going to point out your flaws to a very small number of their friends. And a very small number of your customers are going to try to point out those flaws to a large number of potential customers. But, it’s very easy for that large number to find that small number, far easier than it’s ever been. Many business books point out the merits of running your business as though its dirty laundry could end up on the front page of the Wall Street Journal. The reality of social media is that it doesn’t have to. So long as it’s out there, somewhere, your customers – current or potential – can find it. Are you ready to run a truly transparent business? You should be. Because no one’s going to give you a choice.

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November 19, 2007

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October 16, 2007

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October 9, 2007

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September 21, 2007

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September 18, 2007

Analyzing purchase intent on Web 2.0 and lying with data…

September 18, 2007 | By | No Comments

Last week, I noted Seth Godin’s post about fudging the numbers. Now Steve Rubel gives a textbook example of how this works in the real world. While I understand Steve’s point – that Web 2.0 sites aren’t designed to drive ad revenues – I have two huge issues with his methodology:

  1. As Steve notes, Microsoft adCenter’s Online Commercial Intention tool is, at present, demonstration technology. In fact, I couldn’t repeatedly reproduce Steve’s numbers. While the results were usually close to Steve’s findings, I got different results running the same query more than once. Apparently, the tool must base its answers on live data (kind of cool, actually), but, I wouldn’t put too much emphasis on its data at this point. Microsoft itself states, “some websites that have commercial intent might produce a score of less than 0.5. If you feel that this is the case with your website, we encourage you to contact us to help improve our scoring mechanism.” Not necessarily confidence inspiring. Much worse in the methodology, though, is…
  2. The sites that Steve chose to demonstrate the issue. Comparing Twitter with Amazon? Seriously?!? Apples and oranges, I say. I ran some additional sites (commerce and non-commerce focused), using the same tool. Results below…
  • Web 2.0 art trading site: Artflock.com – 62%
  • Web 2.0 shopping search site: thefind.com – 47%
  • Web 1.0 information site: CNN.com – 45%
  • Web powerhouse: Google – 25%(!)

The key point is it doesn’t matter if it’s Web 1.0, Web 2.0, or what-have-you. What matters is how effectively you understand your users and meet their needs. That’s the way you monetize your site.

Tim Peter

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August 30, 2007