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Tim Peter Thinks

Tim Peter

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October 7, 2011

Web marketing is more integrated than you think (Small Business E-commerce Link Digest – October 7, 2011)

October 7, 2011 | By | No Comments

Marketing on the Internet seems to get harder all the time, doesn’t it? Content marketing, paid search, natural search/SEO, display advertising, remarketing, and on and on and on. How can anyone expect to keep up?

Well, happily, here’s a secret: They’re all much more related than you might think. You build content to meet your customer’s needs. That’s a landing page. Make sure it’s got some appropriate keywords in it, get some folks to link to it, and you’re doing SEO (admittedly, a simplified version, but it’s better than nothing). The better its relevance, the less you pay for clicks if you point paid search or display ads to it. And so on.

Happily, loads of resources exist to help you tie your activities together. Here are just a handful of excellent posts to help you start:

  • Google’s Agency Blog has a great look at using Audience insights to improve your ad campaigns. While Google’s presentation focuses on paid search and display media advertising, the tools offered can help you develop better content and understand your customers’ behaviors more readily, too. (I’ve added the full video below if you’ve got the time to watch it.)
  • Rimm Kaufman Group’s RKGBlog (one of the Thinks 2011 All-Stars), explores paid search conversion by position. Very cool.
  • What, you don’t do and paid search or display advertising? You might want to consider it. The Certified Knowledge blog shows how to use PPC to test SEO. Sweet. (And sorry about their “enroll” popup when you land there. The content’s still worth reading.)
  • Social Media Explorer follows up this theme of “content meets search meets SEO” with this post that, well, explores the future of content in SEO. Very much worth the read.
  • Now, in case you wonder why all of this is a good idea, check out Drew McLellan’s report on mixing media types. It seems customers exposed to the same message in multiple media channels (surprise, surprise) showed better recall than those seeing the message in only one. Offering the same message, in multiple channels, targeted to the right customer, goes a long way to achieving your best results.

Have a great weekend, folks. And remember, we’re here at Thinks every day helping you untangle the Web to improve your marketing and e-commerce activities. Why not subscribe via email and get these updates delivered to you?


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Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

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Tim Peter

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December 21, 2010

Which landing pages contribute to your business goals?

December 21, 2010 | By | No Comments

Not all landing pages are created equal. But, if you haven’t defined e-commerce funnels within Google Analytics, how can you know which ones work best? Want a quick way to figure out the value of your best landing pages? It’s easy.

First, take a look at your Top Landing Pages in the Content section of GA, like this:

Top Landing Pages

You’ll want to select a broad enough period that you get an accurate representation of your traffic. I recommend at least a few months worth of data unless you’ve noticed a big change lately (you do take a look at your top landing pages regularly, don’t you?)

Next, create an Advanced Segment, using the Landing Page as the Dimension with the condition as “Matches exactly” (or “Starts with” if you have query strings attached) and set the value to the name of your highest entry landing page. For instance, I’ve created a segment called “Landing Page = Taking a Look at Weebly”:

Create Top Landing Pages Segment

Then, go ahead and look at your Goals Overview report. You should see something like this:

View Goals by Top Landing Pages Segment

Do the same thing for each of your top landing pages until you’ve covered 80% of your site entries, and you’re well on your way to identifying the pages you want to focus on as you enter next year.

Of course, this whole exercise assumes you’ve set up goals in GA, but, fortunately Google has provided a great tutorial that makes it relatively simple.

Cool, huh?



Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

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And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

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Tim Peter

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February 15, 2008

Landing Page Optimization: The definitive guide to testing and tuning for conversions (Book Review of the Week-ish)

February 15, 2008 | By | No Comments

Tim Ash subtitled his new book, “Landing Page Optimization”, “The Definitive Guide to Testing and Tuning for Conversions”. That’s a bold claim, but one he defends well. Ash, president of SiteTuners.com, knows his subject inside and out and does a solid job of walking web marketers through both the theory and practice of optimizing your web pages to drive increased sales, even when presenting more complex math behind analyzing results (yes, math. Don’t worry, fellow marketer, he keeps it brief). The information in chapters 7 and 8 alone should cover the costs of the book for your entire team. Ash does a great job of discussing important topics in data collection such as data aging. The only place Ash may fall short is in discussing data collection for offline conversions, though, to be fair, that’s likely a topic worthy of a book (or two) of its own. Don’t let that keep you from checking it out. If your job revolves around selling on the web, you need this book.

Increasingly, being a marketer means being a geek marketer, one as comfortable with data analysis as designing a campaign. Folks like Tim Ash and books like “Landing Page Optimization” will ease that transition. Grab a copy today..