Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Tim Peter Thinks

Tim Peter

By

May 30, 2018

The Lessons Marketers Must Learn From GDPR (Thinks Out Loud Episode 219)

May 30, 2018 | By | No Comments

Looking to drive results for your business? Click here to learn more.


The Lessons Marketers Must Learn From GDPR (Thinks Out Loud Episode 219)

The Lessons Marketers Must Learn From GDPR (Thinks Out Loud Episode 219) – Headlines and Show Notes

Subscribe to Thinks Out Loud

Contact information for the podcast: podcast@timpeter.com

Past Insights from Tim Peter Thinks

You might also want to check out these slides I had the pleasure of presenting recently about the key trends shaping marketing in the next year. Here are the slides for your reference:

Technical Details for Thinks Out Loud

Recorded using a Heil Sound PR 30 Large Diaphragm Multipurpose Dynamic Microphone through a Cloud Microphones CL-1 Cloudlifter Mic Activator and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack USB recording interface into Logic Express 9 for the Mac.

Running time: 12m 48s

You can subscribe to Thinks Out Loud in iTunes [iTunes link], the Google Play Store, via our dedicated podcast RSS feed )(or sign up for our free newsletter). You can also download/listen to the podcast here on Thinks using the player at the top of this page.

Tim Peter

By

April 2, 2014

Why Your Customers’ Privacy Matters to Your Marketing – Thinks Out Loud Episode 68

April 2, 2014 | By | No Comments

Why Your Customers’ Privacy Matters to Your Marketing Headlines and Show Notes

IStock 000008378947XSmall

You can also register to receive a free copy of my special report, “Digital Hotel Marketing in a Multiscreen World,” produced in conjunction with Vizergy, here. While it’s targeted to the hospitality industry specifically, most of the lessons apply across verticals.

If you’re looking for more e-commerce tips, check out my recent presentation Elements of E-commerce: How Digital Storytelling Drives Revenue and Results as well:

Contact information for the podcast: podcast@timpeter.com

Technical details: Recorded using an Audio-Technica AT2035 studio condenser microphone through a Mackie Onyx Blackjack USB recording interface into Logic Express 9 for the Mac.

Running time: 14m 52s

You can subscribe to Thinks Out Loud in iTunes [iTunes link], subscribe via our dedicated podcast RSS feed (or better yet, given that Google has now killed Reader, sign up for our free newsletter). You can also download/listen to the podcast here on Thinks using the player below:

Tim Peter

By

February 1, 2013

Tim Peter

By

October 18, 2011

Google removes marketers' access to valuable data, but, maybe, doesn't protect privacy. Have they lost their mind? (BREAKING)

October 18, 2011 | By | No Comments

Ugh. Google announced today that they’re going to make search data more secure by hiding search query and referrer data. Except for when they don’t.

Huh?

It seems Google is going to hide the query and the referrer on searches for anyone logged into Google. While this will only affect, according to Google’s Matt Cutts, “single-digit” numbers of searchers, anything that makes it harder for marketers and e-commerce types to segment their customers, well, sucks.

Now this wouldn’t be so bad if it applied to all logged-in customers for all types of searches. At least then Google could fully claim they’re protecting privacy. But, Google isn’t doing that. The data from paid clicks (i.e., the type Google makes money from), continues getting passed to your analytics tool. Not sure how that’s protecting privacy. Google’s got enough trouble with potential regulators right now. I’m not sure this approach helps them there.

And, don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with Google protecting users’ privacy. I have argued repeatedly that protecting privacy is in marketers’ long-term best interest. I’m just not sure this accomplishes much in that regard.

Google’s announcement came earlier today, so many details are still up in the air. But the best analysis so far comes from Danny Sullivan:

“Not only does the policy discriminate against the SEO side of the search marketing family, it also sends a terrible signal to consumers. It says that referrer data is important enough to protect — but not important enough when advertiser interests are at stake.

To be fair, Google is concerned that people are more likely to do sensitive searches that somehow reveal private information in referrer data through clicks on its free listings. But this could still happen in relation to ads, as well.

I appreciate that Google’s trying to get the balance right, something Cutts said to me repeatedly, as well as all this being a a first step that will likely evolve. I also appreciate what he said about even this already improving things: “What you’re getting today is better than what you were getting yesterday.”

But still, it would seem better if all referrers were blocked. As a marketer, I hate saying that. But as a consumer, it does provide more protection. And for Google, blocking them all doesn’t create this mixed message that might backfire on them with privacy advocates.”

Admittedly, his analysis and mine align pretty heavily. But stay tuned for more. I’m sure we’ll hear a lot about this in the coming days.


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tim Peter

By

September 29, 2011

Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live by Jeff Jarvis (Book Review of the Week-ish)

September 29, 2011 | By | No Comments


Many people who review Jeff Jarvis’ extraordinary new book, “Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live”,spend way too much time focused on Jarvis’ penis. Sure, the man blogs regularly, and quite publicly, about the effects wrought by his prostate cancer. But Jarvis has—sorry, Jeff, no offense intended—bigger things on his mind.

“Public Parts” looks at the meaning of privacy and “publicness,” secrecy and openness, opacity and transparency for individuals, businesses and governments in the age of Facebook and Foursquare, Twitter and Tumblr, search and social. Jarvis looks at each in detail with humor and grace—perhaps not unexpected for someone willing to live his life so publicly.

This isn’t a “business” book, at least not in the sense of the books I usually review. Unlike his earlier book, “What Would Google Do?”, (you can read my review here), there are fewer immediate takeaways. Jarvis has bigger things on his mind than just business (though I would note his section on “new media vs. old business models” should be required reading for anyone relying on the Internet as a marketing and distribution channel).

Jarvis asks important questions about the nature of our increasingly public lives. But more than that, he offers answers and insights. He pokes and he prods. Some positions he advocates will likely make you uncomfortable, perhaps in a way that only a man treated for prostate cancer could.

Good.

Because I guarantee ignoring these things will cause you a lot more discomfort in the long run. As I said, he’s got some big things on his mind.

Read the book. It’ll do you good. Just don’t be surprised when you end up with some pretty big things on your mind, too.


Are you getting enough value out of your small business website? Want to make sure your business makes the most of the local, mobile, social web? thinks helps you understand how to grow your business via the web, every day. Get more than just news. Get understanding. Add thinks to your feed reader today.

Or subscribe via email.

And while you’re at it, don’t forget to follow Tim on Twitter.

Tim Peter & Associates helps companies from startups to the Fortune 500 use the web to reach more customers, more effectively every day. Take a look and see how we can help you.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,