Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Tim Peter Thinks

Tim Peter

By

April 5, 2006

The evolution of niche content and brand fragmentation

April 5, 2006 | By | No Comments

One of the great things about Web 2.0 is its ability to allow consumers to control how they consume content and interact with your brand. Fred posted a link that brings together two of my favorite things: baseball and disruptive technologies. Clearly, Ballbug is like memeorandum for baseball; it is also so much more than that. It represents consumers taking control of their access to yet another type of product. Consumers of news, political commentary, and technology started the trend. You can look at what offerings like SideStep, Kayak, and Mobissimo are doing in the travel space. Expect other industries to feel that same push over time. As a consumer, I think that’s cool. As a marketer, it tells me I’ve got to work a little harder to infuse my brand into everything I do, whether it’s content, product, or service. It’s also an opportunity to beat my competition to it. Isn’t it fun when the rules change?

Tim Peter

By

April 3, 2006

The Times, they are a changing…

April 3, 2006 | By | No Comments

I’ve got to stop using that joke. Seriously.

Anyway, I saw a demo of My Times, the New York Times RSS reader a few weeks back. Interesting notion. They’re looking to use their journalists and editors to filter various blogs and websites. I think it’s a clever way for them to leverage the power of their brand and extending it into a new area. Should be interesting to see if they can pull it off.

Tim Peter

By

April 2, 2006

Are we getting ready to party like it’s 1999 again?

April 2, 2006 | By | No Comments

Newsweek has decided to put Web 2.0 on its cover this week. Is it just me, or does the irrational exuberance of a few years back seem like it’s just around the corner again? I’m as keen to see a return to fun and excitement on the Web as anyone. I just worry that we’re about to see a whole bunch of folks repeat the mistakes of the past. At least this time, it seems that a number of folks are thinking through how to make money on the deal, instead of this “selling a dollar for 90 cents and make it up on volume” silliness we all dealt with the first time through. Tim Leberecht (who I’ve just started reading, thanks to Technorati), has a viewpoint on this, too, recapping the recent thoughts here about whether Web 2.0 can live up to its hype. Check it out. It’s worth the read.

Tim Peter

By

April 2, 2006

The two most exciting words in the English language…

April 2, 2006 | By | No Comments

Play ball!

Thank God baseball is back. White Sox-Indians tonight, and the Mets (God love ’em), tomorrow afternoon. Now if Barry Bonds would just strain a hammy or something before he has a chance to assault Ruth and Aaron’s records this season, much as he’s assaulted the integrity of the game, I’ll be even happier. Though, to be fair, he simply took advantage of a weak leadership within the league and a union run amok.

I’m reading Jeff Pearlman’s “The Bad Guys Won” right now. Fun stuff. Brings back many, many memories of the glory days. This new group of players doesn’t seem to have as many characters (though Delgado probably would have fit in), but they look like they might finally be able to give the Braves a run. Ahh… the joys of April. As the Green Day song goes, “wake me up when September ends.”

Tim Peter

By

April 1, 2006

Clever way of measuring awareness of offline marketing online

April 1, 2006 | By | No Comments

I ran across this post on Fast Company this afternoon. Clever, actually. My favorite line is the part where they say, “In this case, advertising is trumping engineering in creating value.” That’s a bunch of hooey, though I think it’s a great example of strong advertising and marketing creating demand, at least for their tchotchke. The thing that I think is most interesting about the eBay Index, as Fast Company calls it, is its value as a metric of awareness. Clever, clever marketing idea, and an innovative way to build buzz around your product. Seth Godin would be proud (or better yet, read Trout and Ries. You’ll get more from it.)